Providing Specific Details in Your Police Reports

Providing Specific Details in Your Police Reports

Providing specific details in your police reports helps you build a reputation for accuracy and professionalism. Avoid vague adjectives (“belligerent,” “evasive,” “hostile”) and generalizations (“I processed the scene”). Your reports should state exactly what you saw and heard and what you did during each call.

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Manipulation-police-training

Police officer training often includes instruction on dealing with manipulation, such as arguing, attempts to charm you, and threats. Following a few simple guidelines will help you carry out your duties efficiently and safely. Essential skills include the “broken record” technique, sticking to objective facts, and following procedures carefully.

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Police Training for Dealing with Hearing-Impaired Citizens

Your police training will include the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Persons who are deaf or hearing impaired have important rights. You need to know your agency’s policies, and you should be familiar with resources, such as interpreters, for dealing with deaf persons. You should also know some common-sense guidelines for interviewing deaf persons, whether they’re lip-reading, wearing a hearing aid, or talking to you through an interpreter.

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Police Training for Avoiding Deaths in Custody

Your police training will include two medical conditions that cause suspects to die in custody: positional asphyxia (strangulation caused by a body position that interferes with breathing) and excited delirium (a psychiatric condition that causes bizarre behavior and can lead to strangulation or cardiac arrest). You should be especially watchful when suspects are restrained face-down with their hands behind their backs. Put suspects into a seated position quickly, monitor them for symptoms of breathing difficulties or cardiac problems, and call for medical help if you see signs of possible medical problems.

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Police Training for Safe Building Searches

Police training for building searches emphasizes safety. Because a hidden suspect has the tactical advantage, officers must have an effective plan before entering the building. Sometimes the best approach is to wait for a tactical team that’s equipped with technology for a safe and effective search.

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Objectivity-in-police-reports

The objectivity requirement means that police reports may include only observable, objective facts. Reports cannot refer to an officer’s intuition, hunches, experience, or reasoning processes. The objectivity requirement also prohibits officers from stating opinions, drawing conclusions, and exhibiting bias in their reports.

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marijuana

Your police training is likely to include information about the status of local, state, and federal laws relating to marijuana (cannabis), a psychoactive drug and popular recreational substance. Because of current controversies about the enforcement of marijuana laws, police officers should keep abreast of research studies and changes in local and state ordinances concerning marijuana.

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V-Academy interviewing children police training

Your police training will provide you useful guidelines for conducting interviews with various groups of people with special needs, including children. When interviewing a child, take particular care when selecting the setting and planning the direction your questions will take. Be aware of possible pitfalls: You don’t want to re-traumatize a child who’s been victimized, and you don’t want the information to be compromised because the child is intimidated or confused by your questions.

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Police Training and an Addiction Crisis | V-Academy

Your police training will include information about the recent explosion in addiction to prescription painkillers and heroin. According to the Centers for Disease Control, the US is experiencing the worst drug epidemic in its history, with demographics much broader than it has seen in the past. Many middle-aged white rural and suburban Americans are becoming addicted and dying of overdoses.

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Police officer at front door of home interrogating a woman

Your police training will prepare you to handle domestic violence calls, which can involve a variety of intimate situations; partners may be married or living together, heterosexual or same sex.  Often there is a longstanding pattern that may include intimidation, controlling behavior, and violence. Your responsibilities will include maintaining control of the situation, uncovering and […]

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Police-in-Riot-Gear-Holding-the-Line

Police equipment such as sirens, radios, riot gear, and armored vehicles conveys a powerful message about the presence of law enforcement and its readiness to take charge. In some situations, however, police equipment can have a negative effect. Police officers need to consider both advantages and potential hazards when they’re selecting equipment for dealing with […]

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police-interview

Sensitivity to victims is important in police interviews, especially with victims of rape, domestic violence, and sexual predation. Advice, lecturing, and blame can shut down an interview, hampering an investigation. Sensitivity creates trust and encourages victims to share information and cooperate with law enforcement.

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Cyberbullying and Sexting Reynolds

Your police training will include information about teenagers who participate in “cyber bullying” and “sexting.” These popular behaviors employ electronic technology with potentially devastating effects. Cyber bullying is a form of harassment via texting and social networking sites (Facebook, for example.) “Sexting” usually means that two people in a consensual relationship are sending each other […]

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United-States-Constitution-and-flag--famous-US-document

Your police training will cover the rights guaranteed to all Americans under the US Constitution. Even when evidence is overwhelming, every suspect is guaranteed the right to remain silent, obtain legal representation, and be treated as an innocent person until guilt is decided in a court of law. You will need to be familiar with […]

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